SALRI heads to the Upper Spencer Gulf to talk about looking after vulnerable adults

REFORM: Doctor David Plater, left, and Divya Narayan, right, both of SALRI, with community member Reeva Brice. Photo: supplied.
REFORM: Doctor David Plater, left, and Divya Narayan, right, both of SALRI, with community member Reeva Brice. Photo: supplied.

An independent law reform group is going to visit the Upper Spencer Gulf to get community input on reviewing the rights of vulnerable adults.

The South Australian Law Reform Institute (SALRI), based at the Adelaide University Law School, will be visiting Port Pirie and Port Augusta on May 19 and 20 as it looks to review the Ageing and Adult Safeguarding Act 1995.

The Act looks after the rights of ageing persons and vulnerable adults through the Office for Ageing Well and the Adult Safeguarding Unit, which monitor and respond to reports of abuse.

SALRI said it is keen to obtain community input as the views of the people are important to understanding if laws are effectively operating to look after vulnerable people and what changes might need to be made.

It said it will also seek community input at the operation of the Mental Health Act.

"SALRI is committed to an active and inclusive consultation process, especially with regional and Aboriginal communities," SALRI deputy director David Plater said.

SALRI will be at UniHub Port Pire from 9am until 10:30am on Friday, May 20 and have encouraged community members to stop by for a discussion.

People wanting to know more about SALRI's work can get in contact via email on salri@adelaide.edu.au.au.