Student finds eerie connection between the smelters and the Somerton man

WAS HE A SPY?: A photo of the Somerton Man's face and part of the cryptic code found inside a page from a poetry book.
WAS HE A SPY?: A photo of the Somerton Man's face and part of the cryptic code found inside a page from a poetry book.

Last week South Australian detectives were given permission to exhume the remains of an unidentified male, known as the Somerton Man, from an Adelaide grave in order to extract DNA to potentially discover who he is.

The man, who was found on an Adelaide beach with no identification, and neatly dressed in a suit.

The back page from a Persian poem book called 'The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam' was found in his coat pocket. The page read tamam shud which is translated to '"ended".

A hidden cryptic message was found inside the book and a phone number of a nurse from Glenelg, who claimed she did not know the man.

In 2013 an Adelaide University Professor Derek Abbott burned a sample of the man's hair and discovered it showed a high level of lead in the sample.

Fast forward to 2021 and a John Pirie Secondary School student, Holly Nichols, has made an eerie connection to the mystery man and Port Pirie, which has sparked conversation from conspiracy theorists.

Many experts and locals and have claimed that the mystery man was working as a Russian spy during the cold war.

The Soviets were yet to get their hands on an atomic bomb and back in 1948 the Americans and the British were producing uranium at the Port Pirie lead smelter in secret.

Because of the lead discovered in his hair and the production of uranium in Pirie, Ms Nichols believes the Somerton Man was a Russian spy who travelled to Port Pirie to gather information on uranium production.

Details show five ships left Port Pirie during the time the man's body was discovered which had the same lead readings as the Somerton Man.

The theory is he may have travelled to Adelaide on one of the ships where he ultimately met with foul play. The Australian Navy has admitted that Russian submarines were interested in the Spencer Gulf during this time.