Country SA survivors of attempted suicide supported under programs

MORE SUPPORT: New suicide prevention program in South Australia seeks to help most vulnerable from falling through the cracks. Photo: Shutterstock
MORE SUPPORT: New suicide prevention program in South Australia seeks to help most vulnerable from falling through the cracks. Photo: Shutterstock

A network of mental health services to assist country South Australian survivors of attempted suicide are in place so they can continue their recovery journey close to home, a state department has shared.

The confirmation comes as a new metropolitan-based pilot program was announced this month which also assists survivors of suicide.

'The Way Back Support Service', a Beyondblue initiative, provides one-on-one support to survivors after they leave hospital care in the city.

Chiefly, the service helps people who are at greater risk of suicide discharged from the Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH) and The Queen Elizabeth Hospital.

A SA Health spokerson this week told Australian Community Media (ACM), owner of this masthead country SA also has support services in place.

"A number of community mental health services are also available across the six regional Local Health Networks to provide services to those recovering from a suicide attempt," the spokesperson said.

A number of community mental health services are also available across the six regional Local Health Networks to provide services to those recovering from a suicide attempt.

SA Health spokesperson

"We also work closely with the Country SA Primary Health Networks who have a number of support services available to people living in regional or remote areas."

Furthermore, Wellbeing SA is responsible for developing South Australian Suicide Prevention Networks (SPN), and provides ongoing support to the 42 SPN's across the state.

"These networks work to raise community awareness about the subject of suicide through locally developed initiatives to break down the stigma and myths and encourage live-saving conversations," a spokesperson said.

These members are often members of the community with an interest in helping to prevent suicides in their community.

"As is common in all communities, many members of the SPNs have been impacted by suicide, either through personal experience of suicide attempts or suicidal thinking, or through the experiences or loss of a loved one," the spokesperson added.

Wellbeing SA also provides funding for local suicide prevention projects on an annual basis via the South Australian Suicide Prevention Community Grants scheme.

Funding of up to $10,000 for local community events is aimed at raising awareness and improving help seeking and empowering communities to take action in supporting people in need.

Historically, the grants have supported a large number of identified priority populations including people who may have survived one or more suicide attempts, Aboriginal people, youth, members of the sexually and gender diverse communities, older persons, CALD communities, men, women and at-risk professions.

The next round of grants is due to open in the coming months with details to be advertised across the state.

Meanwhile, this month Health and Wellbeing Stephen Wade said the support works to ensure that people at increased risk of suicide don't fall through the gaps.

"Suicide is a complex issue, however we know raising awareness, breaking down stigma and encouraging help-seeking behaviours can save lives," he said.

This story Prevention plans help save lives first appeared on The Murray Valley Standard.