St Mark's College Year 12 students receive top marks in research project

GETTING MARKS: These St Mark's College Year 12 students all received an A+ for their Research Project. Georgia Salt, left, with Amelia Smart, Lucy ODea, Jesse Smith, Lillian Keain, Sophie Hall and Sophie Millard.
GETTING MARKS: These St Mark's College Year 12 students all received an A+ for their Research Project. Georgia Salt, left, with Amelia Smart, Lucy ODea, Jesse Smith, Lillian Keain, Sophie Hall and Sophie Millard.

St Mark's College Year 12 students have celebrated "excellent" results for their research projects again this year.

About 51.43 per cent achieved a grade in the A band with seven students achieving the ultimate A+ result.

The A band results put the students well above the state average of 39.4 per cent and has seen another improvement on last year's results.

Deputy principal Mark Forster said the class of 2020 was the first year that all students had passed the course in the first semester.

"If you look at the trends in the past five years, 2016 and 2017, we kind of plateaued at 27 to 28 per cent and in 2018 we increased that to 45.5 per cent so we almost doubled that," he said.

"Last year, we achieved 51.38 per cent and we set a goal of 50 per cent so we were really happy with that."

Mr Forster said the students should be proud of their level of achievement.

"Well, it is great for the students, I think it reinforces to them that they can meet those high expectations," he said.

"The technique we use consistently across the faculty is to just break it down, as it is a very overwhelming subject and there is a lot of anxiety around it from the students.

"It is about breaking it down, having high expectations, but providing the support and the skill development in the students to be able to achieve it."

Year 12 student Jesse Smith said he thinks it was his chosen research topic and support from teachers that helped him receive the ultimate grade.

"I researched how the development of programs and policies aimed at indigenous Australians had increased their participation in organised sport and the impact on their communities," he said.

"I am not from an Indigenous background and I don't play much sport, but I just thought it was interesting and it was something I didn't really know about.

"I did go to my teacher to get some ideas and inspiration with where I should go next and what I should do."

Year 12 student Amelia Smart said she had chosen to focus on aged care because she is interested in the field and in working in a hospital.

"My question was, 'do aged care facilities care about the mental health of residents?'," she said.

"I found it is a bit of an issue today and their physical health is more of a priority, but I also realised that it can be quite difficult to cater to all of their individual needs.

"I felt like I did do well, but I have never done anything like this before so I didn't know what to expect.

"Mr Forster had a lot of tips because he was very passionate about he research projects so that was really helpful."

Both students offered some words of advice for the up-and-coming Year 12 classes.

"Pick a topic that you find interesting and want to learn about so that you don't get bored along the way," Jesse said.

Amelia said: "Try not to prioritise all your subjects over the research project because you have a lot of things due before it, but it is still important to keep making progress throughout the semester."

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