Port Pirie's Sarah Newman raises more than $2000 for Butterfly Foundation

TRIM: Sarah Newman shed her long locks for a good cause close to her heart - the campaign to help teenagers with body-image and eating problems. Photo: Phil Hensel

TRIM: Sarah Newman shed her long locks for a good cause close to her heart - the campaign to help teenagers with body-image and eating problems. Photo: Phil Hensel

Last year Sarah Newman was the Dux of St Mark's College and now, just two months into 2020, she has wowed the community again, cutting off 35cm of her hair to raise more than $2000 for the Butterfly Foundation.

At the start of December, Sarah opened up a fundraising account on Everyday Hero to collect money for the foundation with a target of $700.

But she quickly reached this goal and aimed much higher for $2000. Her tally is sitting at $2400.

The foundation aims to change the culture surrounding eating disorders and negative body-image and helps to provide education on these serious issues to people around the nation.

Sarah said she was inspired to raise money because it was an issue close to her heart, having seen friends struggle with negative body image issues. When people started donating so much, she was amazed.

"I was thanking a lot of people who put in big donations - it means a lot to me," she said.

Sarah's mum Marta Newman is proud of her daughter for taking the initiative to help the cause.

"I think it is a really big thing for her to cut her long hair and raise money and she was really passionate about supporting the foundation," she said.

Adding that it was fantastic to see her friends and teachers backing her decision.

Foundation fundraising manager Elizabeth Herd said her group would cease to exist without the "generous support" of residents. "It is about coming together as a community to raise awareness and vital funds to help us continue to educate and provide treatment and recovery support services for those experiencing eating disorders and negative body-image concerns," she said.

"We are grateful to be supported by generous groups of people seeking to do their part to bring about change."

With almost 20,000 "contacts" yearly, the foundation's national helpline is often the first point of action for people with an eating disorder or body-image issue.

A key part of the foundation's role is to refer people experiencing an eating disorder for treatment by professionals who understand eating disorders so people can gain help to recover or care for someone.