Thoughtful waste disposal became a feature of student life at St Mark's

MULCH: Morrie Coates puts a banana skin into the compost bucket held by Adam Smith while watched by schoolmates Cohen Tee, left, and Brodie Fowler.
MULCH: Morrie Coates puts a banana skin into the compost bucket held by Adam Smith while watched by schoolmates Cohen Tee, left, and Brodie Fowler.

Waste is definitely an intriguing subject.

So said a group of students at St Mark's College.

They found the secret of proper disposal for the school's rubbish.

Things like apple cores last year began to find their way into the compost at the college farm instead of going into general waste.

This was because the campus adopted a plan dreamed up by science teacher Tom Gilligan's Year 7 class.

Student Adam Smith said they had looked at landfill and waste and found that 40 per cent of rubbish was organic and compost-able.

"We got a plan up - the best idea was composting," he said. The students approached the parents and friends council and other senior teachers seeking funding for the project.

After principal Greg Hay spoke of how important it was and that it should be school-wide, the original amount of the grant was doubled to $600.

"We bought about six compost bins and 20 compost buckets to be attached to the campus rubbish bins," Adam said.

"These are emptied into the school farm as compost.

"This is used to grow vegetables and fruit and maybe if we get really good at it, the produce could be sold. Other benefits to the school were less costs in transport of waste to the dump."

The main biodegradable items now going into the buckets are apple cores and banana skins. Year 7 co-ordinator Toni Freer said the boys had made a video on how to use the buckets and where the material went.

It was shown to the rest of the school and put on the college website, Facebook and YouTube social media.

The next step is to educate their schoolmates.

This would result in thoughtful disposal becoming routine.

Student Brodie Fowler said, "it is a small step, but a big leap for mankind".

The boys praised their teacher Mr Gilligan.

When asked what they wanted to do for a career, Cohen Tee and Morrie Coates said they were unsure and Brodie Fowler said, "cricket or paleaontology".

It was no surprise when their leader, Adam Smith, said he wanted to be a biologist.

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