Expert says ban on GM crops archaic

Genetically modified crops will be on the agenda at this month's Growing SA conference with a renowned plant geneticist speaking on the topic.
Genetically modified crops will be on the agenda at this month's Growing SA conference with a renowned plant geneticist speaking on the topic.

Genetically modified crops will be on the agenda at this month's Growing SA conference with a renowned plant geneticist speaking on the topic.

University of Florida professor Kevin Folta said South Australia was way behind the eight-ball when it came to the effects of the GM moratorium.

"When SA's moratorium was enacted, today's gene editing technologies did not exist, so they banned technology not based on science, but because it is technology," he said.

"It is insane to restrict any technology for decades. It puts SA decades behind dozens of other countries and the rest of Australia."

Prof Folta said bans on any type of technology could cause a ripple effect.

"Governments in the developing world are wrestling with their own regulatory decisions and when industrialised governments reject technology, it raises suspicion elsewhere," he said.

"It affects policy. Solutions in the developing world have been devised to address specific issues such as vitamin A deficiency and disease resistance in food staples.

"These are desperately needed and currently exist, but are not deployed.

"When the industrialised world rejects technology, people without the luxury of first-world precaution suffer."

University of Florida Professor Kevin Folta

University of Florida Professor Kevin Folta

Professor Folta will be one of the keynote speakers at the conference, hosted by Grain Producers SA and Livestock SA on August 27-28 at the Adelaide Hills Convention Centre, Hahndorf.

Registrations close this Thursday, August 22 at 5pm - visit https://growingsa.com.au/

This story Expert says ban on GM crops archaic first appeared on The Murray Valley Standard.