Get active this Women's Health Week

HEALTHY LIFESTYLE: By signing up to Women's Health Week, women will receive daily health tips, tools and information to help them unlock their own powers for good health. Photo: Supplied by Jean Hailes
HEALTHY LIFESTYLE: By signing up to Women's Health Week, women will receive daily health tips, tools and information to help them unlock their own powers for good health. Photo: Supplied by Jean Hailes

For more than 25 years, national not-for-profit organisation Jean Hailes for Women's Health has been helping women make their own good health a priority.

Jean Hailes provides information and free resources to women and the health professionals who care for them. For one week each year, the organisation turns up the volume on women's health with its annual national awareness campaign - Women's Health Week.

From September 2 to 6, Women's Health Week encourages people in clubs, communities and workplaces to get involved. They can host or attend a health event during the week, or simply sign up to receive five days of free daily emails loaded with articles, videos, podcasts, quizzes and more - all aimed at improving women's knowledge of their own bodies and health.

Ultimately, we wish to equip women with the tools to lead a healthy and happy life."

Brenda Jones, Women's Health Week campaign manager

"Women's Health Week is a fun and informative way for women to focus on themselves and learn some valuable health information," Women's Health Week campaign manager Brenda Jones says.

"Learn some new health information by listening to our daily podcast while walking the dog, watching our Facebook live events at work, taking a quick quiz or reading one of our health articles."

Ms Jones believes that women are leading busier lives than ever before, which makes them more prone to look after others ahead of themselves.

"Ultimately, we wish to equip women with the tools to lead a healthy and happy life," Ms Jones says.

In its annual National Women's Health Survey, Jean Hailes identified the two biggest barriers to women following a healthy lifestyle is lack of time and health not being a priority. Yet, by making even small changes, women can improve their health and reduce their risk of getting a range of illnesses.

Of the more than 100,000 women who took part in Women's Health Week last year, 92 per cent said they were making positive health changes because of the information they received during the week. By signing up to the week, women will receive daily health tips, tools and information to help them unlock their own powers for good health in five key areas, focusing on one area each day. These include how to move more and stay motivated, reproductive health, heart, breast and mental health. For more visit womenshealthweek.com.au.