Charles Sturt University assures students after Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency finds problems

REGISTERATION: Charles Sturt University's registration has been extended for 4 years with five set conditions to be met. Picture: Charles Sturt University
REGISTERATION: Charles Sturt University's registration has been extended for 4 years with five set conditions to be met. Picture: Charles Sturt University

CHARLES Sturt University has moved to assure students despite a regulatory authority finding severe shortcomings.

In a statement released late last week, the university's vice-chancellor Andrew Vann said the conditions will not impact current students or alumni in any way.

Mr Vann said the conditions of the registration "posed no risk" to the university's current operations and long-term viability.

ASSURING COMMUNITY: CSU Vice-chancellor Andrew Vann assures students despite shortcomings identified.

ASSURING COMMUNITY: CSU Vice-chancellor Andrew Vann assures students despite shortcomings identified.

"Our degrees and course accreditation are unaffected and remain valid and credible," he said.

The Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency, however, has only granted the university a four-year extension of its registration with the standard re-registration being seven years.

The nation's regulatory authority has also set five strict conditions that the university must meet to ensure its future.

The conditions include academic misconduct, student performance reporting and academic risk management.

Mr Vann said the institution will continue to work closely with the regulator to address the conditions applied.

The university was originally barred from enrolling new students through its study centres with concerns over management and quality assurance.

The condition, however, has since been lifted after the university provided more information to TEQSA.

"TEQSA has stated publicly that requests for extension of registration periods can be considered once the regulator is satisfied with compliance," Mr Vann said.

In the meantime, Mr Vann said it was "business as usual" for teaching and learning delivery while they work on ensuring its academic governance processes are proven to be robust.

"We are always reviewing and improving what we do and how we do it to ensure the best outcomes for our students," he said.

"We are confident in the enhancements we have initiated and are now strengthening our approach to quality assurance through the development and implementation of a comprehensive Quality Assurance Framework.

"Managing academic risk both internally and through our teaching and learning delivery partners is a crucial priority for the university."