Walking the Pirie streets for political redemption

SENATE CAMPAIGN: Tim Burrow, of Brighton, walked the streets of Port Pirie while wearing a sandwich-board promoting his bid for the Senate.
SENATE CAMPAIGN: Tim Burrow, of Brighton, walked the streets of Port Pirie while wearing a sandwich-board promoting his bid for the Senate.

A one-man advertising billboard is overcoming the Australian Democrats lack of finances for its revived political campaign for May 18.

Tim Burrow, of Brighton, walked the streets of Port Pirie on Thursday while wearing a sandwich-board promoting his bid for the Senate.

He waved two placards which said "we're back ... to keep the b------s honest".

The party lost its registration in 2016 partly because of lack of membership, but was re-registered just three days before Prime Minister Scott Morrison called the federal election.

Mr Burrow, an agribusiness specialist and self-described Christian, said the re-registration had come in the nick of time.

"We don't have any money to speak of so we are trying to scoot our way into the Senate rather than spend our way ... we are talking to the people," he said.

"Ninety per cent of people have a nondescript reaction to my sandwich-boards, but nine per cent give a thumbs-up sign or toot their car horn and less than one percent don't like me.

"The main comment is that it is 'good to have you back'."

Mr Burrow is the party's lead South Australian candidate for the Senate and his bid has been a "bucket-list" idea for some time.

"I have been in agribusiness for 40 years. You can tell this by my grey hair. My first job was as a farmhand at Mangala, north of Cleve," he said.

"I always wanted to be a farmer, but I could not make it - my parents were both tradespeople. I attended Roseworthy College and took a farm management degree followed later in life by a graduate diploma in agriculture marketing.

"It has been on my bucket-list for many years to be in politics.

"I toyed with the idea of being an Independent, but the advice was that Independents don't get elected. I looked around for a party that had beliefs that I could live with and they could live with me.

"The proposed national integrity commission is a big issue for us - as the Australian Democrats founder Don Chipp said, 'keep the b------s honest'."

He contrasted his campaign with that of big-spending billionaire and United Australia Party leader Clive Palmer. "We have to do it on a shoestring ... or a sandwich-board," he said.

The streets of Port Pirie were wet on Thursday, but the farming streak came out in Mr Burrow who celebrated the rain as he kept walking the footpaths with his signs.

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