Minister visits children under her care

CREATIVE: Child Protection Minister Rachel Sanderson, left, joins Dee and Angie, from the Port Pirie office of Ms Sanderson's department, at the biscuit decorating table.
CREATIVE: Child Protection Minister Rachel Sanderson, left, joins Dee and Angie, from the Port Pirie office of Ms Sanderson's department, at the biscuit decorating table.

Child Protection MInister Rachel Sanderson was in Port Broughton to visit the children under “her” care.

:MASCOT: Oog from the Guardian of Children and Young People 'chats' with Child Protection Minister Rachel Sanderson at the Family Fun Day at Port Broughton on Tuesday.

:MASCOT: Oog from the Guardian of Children and Young People 'chats' with Child Protection Minister Rachel Sanderson at the Family Fun Day at Port Broughton on Tuesday.

At a Family Fun Day at the football oval, she laughed and smiled with about 100 kids and carers,

“The children are with foster parents or kinship carers under my guardianship,” she said.

For their own protection, the children have been removed from their families.

“It is essential for me to get out to meet them face-to-face and learn from them. It is just doing your job,” Ms Sanderson said.

The Minister feels a bond with the children as well as their carers and workers from the Child Protection Department.

“Everyone was mingling which was good to see, a really successful event,” she said.

“It was great to see all the kids really involved.

“We did a Health Hustle for the opening, including the Macarena and Madison to warm up. There was biscuit decorating, beading, kicking the football and a tug-of-war.

“It is important to meet not only the children and see how they are doing, but to meet their carers and staff.

“You get better ideas and better ways to do things. It is a great way of developing policies and achieve efficiencies.”

Ms Sanderson was in Port Augusta and Whyalla for similar sport-based events.

She attended 150th birthday celebrations at Point Pearce on Yorke Peninsula.

Before the coming of the European pastoralists, the peninsula was the home of the Narungga people, who occupied the land from near Port Wakefield in the east, over to Port Broughton in the west, and all the way to the tip of the peninsula.

In 1868 about 600 acres, south of Wallaroo, was given over to set up an Aboriginal mission, later called Point Pearce.

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